All About Judy Hogan

Judy Hogan - in brief

Judy Hogan was born in Zenith, Kansas, on May 27, 1937.  She has lived in North Carolina and in the Triangle area for 42 years.  She brought to the state a new poetry journal (Hyperion, 1970-81) and in 1976 she founded Carolina Wren Press.  She has been active in the area since the early 70s as a reviewer, book distributor, publisher, teacher, writing consultant, and organizer of conferences, readings, and book signing events.  In 1984 she helped found and was the first President of the N.C. Writers' Network, serving until 1987. 

            Her first mystery novel Killer Frost was published in 2012 by Mainly Murder Press in Connecticut.  She has published five volumes of poetry with small presses, and two prose works, Watering the Roots in a Democracy (1989) and The PMZ Poor Woman’s Cookbook (2000).  Her second mystery, Farm Fresh and Fatal appeared Oct 1, 2014 also from Mainly Murder Press. A translation of her volume of poetry, Beaver Soul, was published by the Kostroma Writers’ Organization in 1997. The original English of  Beaver Soul appeared in 2013 from Finishing Line Press in Kentucky.  

    Her papers, correspondence, and 25 years of extensive diaries are in the Special Collections Department of the Perkins Library at Duke University.  She has taught all forms of creative writing since 1974, through libraries, in extension programs, and on her own.  She taught Freshman English at St. Augustine’s College in Raleigh, 2004-2007.  She teaches writing workshops and does free lance editing for creative writers.  Since mid-2007 she has been able to give more time to her fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry.

            Between 1990 and 2007 she visited Kostroma, Russia, five times, teaching American literature at Kostroma University in 1995, and working on some exchange visits and publishing with Kostroma writers and artists.  She gave a paper on the Russian poet, Anna Akhmatova, at a Literature Conference at Kostroma University in March, 2007.  She is active in environmental and community issues in Chatham County, was a member of the Steering Committee of the Chatham Coalition (2004-06), and she belongs to N.C. WARN, Carolina Farm Stewardship Association, Sisters in Crime, The N. C. Writers. Network, and Southeast Chatham Citizens’ Advisory Council.  In 2013 she began to work against fracking, which threatens her home and small farm in Southeast Chatham County.

            Judy lives and farms in Moncure, N.C., near Jordan Lake.

All About Judy Hogan - Biography

Judy Hogan was born into the small, wheat farming community of Zenith, Kansas, on May 27, 1937. Her family moved often as she was growing up, as her father was a minister and was also in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War. She has lived in or visited almost every part of the United States. She has counted 42 moves house-to-house in her life. She has lived in North Carolina for 42 years, in Cedar Grove, Chapel Hill, Saxapahaw, and now Moncure in Chatham County. She brought to the state a new poetry journal (Hyperion, 1970-81) and in 1976 she founded Carolina Wren Press. She has been active in the Triangle area since the early 70s as a reviewer, book distributor, publisher, teacher, writing consultant, and organizer of conferences, readings, and book signing events.

Between 1975 and 1978 she was the chair person for the national grassroots small press association, COSMEP. Between 1974 and 1978 she worked on several small press distribution projects, and between 1978 and 1981, she coordinated the Home Grown Books project, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, to syndicate small press reviews for small town newspapers. Judy helped found and was the first president of the board of the N.C. Writers Network from 1984-87. Between 1981 and 1991 she taught free A Roadmap to Great Literature for New Writers courses in the Durham County Library (at both Warren and Main Libraries. Between 1986 and 1989 she also taught classes in the May Memorial Library in Burlington, because of grants received from the National Endowment for the Humanities Library Program.

Between 1964 and 1968 Judy was a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California in Berkeley, emphasis Greek philosophy and literature. She completed her course work and some of the qualifying exams but did not complete the degree. She has a B.A. in Letters from the University of Oklahoma, and studied one year in Comparative Literature on a Woodrow Wilson fellowship at Indiana University.

Judy's debut traditional mystery was published Sept 1, 2012 by Mainly Murder Press of Connecticut.  Her first book, poetry, Cassandra Speaking (1977) was published by Thorp Springs Press, Austin, Texas. Sunblazoned, a second collection of poems, appeared in 1982 from Sunbury Press Books, Bronx, N.Y., and was nominated for the Lamont prize. Northwoods Press in Maine published Susannah, Teach Me to Love/ Grace, Sing to Me in 1986, and Latitudes Press of Mansfield, Texas, published Light Food in 1989. The Russian edition of Beaver Soul came out from the Kostroma Writers' Organization in 1997, and the English original from Finishing Line Press Oct 1, 2013.  She has also published individual poems, diary collages, articles, and reviews in local, state, and national literary journals and newspapers. Her book on how to organize free writing classes in libraries (Watering the Roots in a Democracy) was funded under grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and was available free to libraries all over the United States. 

Under the Carolina Wren imprint, Judy put more than 100 North Carolina writers into print, either in single author editions or through anthologies. Judson Jerome called her one of the most experienced small press editors and heartily recommended her editorial consultation in a Writer's Digest article of April 1987. She continues to help writers through her writing and editing consultation service and through classes given both privately and in cooperation with arts councils and her local community college (CCCC).

Since she turned Carolina Wren Press over to others in 1991, she has been able to give more time to her writing and to travel. She worked between 1990 and 1996 on some exchange visits with Russian writers. In this connection she has been studying the Russian language since 1991. In the fall of 1995 she offered a series of lectures in 20th Century American poetry to students and faculty of the English Department at the Kostroma Pedagogical University in Kostroma, Russia. She was co-project director with Mikhail Bazankov for an anthology of North Carolina poets published in a dual-language edition (English-Russian), Earth and Soul, in 2001 and distributed to libraries and schools all over the Kostroma Region. She has translated and published some of the many writers she met in Kostroma and St. Petersburg.  In 2007 she gave a paper on spirituality in the Russian poet, Anna Akhmatova to the Literature Conference held in March at Kostroma University.

Her papers, correspondence, and 25 years of extensive diaries are in the Special Collections Department of the Perkins Library at Duke University. All material is now over 10 years old and may be read by the general public. This library also has the Carolina Wren Press archive. Judy believes that women must tell the true stories of their lives. She was the instigator of the Tell Me A Story That's True conference held in June 1991 at NC Central Univerity in Durham, NC.

Judy lives in Moncure, N.C., at the southern end of Jordan Lake, near the Haw, Deep, at the beginning of the Cape Fear River Basin. She works with N.C. WARNto prevent the storing of dangerous nuclear waste in this river basin. Most of the poems she has written since 1987 concern the Haw River, its animals, birds, trees, flowers. Her three children are grown, and she has five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.  She is a small farmer and sells eggs and figs as well as providing about half her food.

Biography updated March 12, 2014.


Classes Mysteries

Contact Judy: judyhogan@mindspring.com
Updated: March 9, 2012